Legacy of Death
Audio / May 2, 2016

Released April 2016 ‘Legacy of Death’ carries on the story set forth in ‘The Paradox Planet’ in which the planet Aoris is at war with itself in different time zones. Understandably, there is a serious note to proceedings as they can directly be applied to the real world presently with the future citizens traveling into their own past to save species and resources that their ancestors wasted and squandered while polluting their world. However, the ecological message is satisfactorily layered within a madcap adventure that it never becomes too preachy or hindering to the story. ‘Legacy of Death,’ by necessity, is a bit more serious and somber than its opening act in some regards, but it’s unafraid to continue with its comedy as well. The major supporting characters from the first story, Tom Chadbon’s Embery who discovered time travel and Simon Rouse’s Drang who is coordinating the war against the past, have less to do in this half as the situations themselves are managed and the main characters become more involved. Still, the resultant non-linear story offers plenty of logical and surprising twists and makes good use of each of its characters. Jumping back and forth through time zones may…

The Paradox Planet
Audio / March 17, 2016

Released March 2016 Series five of The Fourth Doctor Adventures continues with Jonathan Morris’s ‘The Paradox Planet,’ the opening story of two which sees the Doctor, Romana, and K9 struck by a Time Tank in the vortex and finding themselves trapped on opposing sides of a temporal war on the planet Aoris. As the TARDIS crew soon finds out, soldiers from the future are attacking the past of their own planet while collecting valuable resources and endangered animals, at the same time trying to avoid and fight off planned attacks that have been lying dormant for generations. A planet at war with itself in different eras is a fascinating concept, especially when considering the calculated moves that the future’s soldiers need to make to avoid a misstep that could result in a disastrous paradox. Romana being split up from the Doctor seems to be a recurring theme this series, and that happens again thanks to the surreal events of the opening ten minutes, but placing a protagonist within the machinations of each side is a necessary move that allows for the understanding- if not the sympathizing- of both sides. Likewise, at least so far, expanding this conceit into two releases…