The Eaters of Light
Episode / June 18, 2017

Aired 17 June 2017 SOME SPOILERS FOLLOW With ‘The Eaters of Light,’ Rona Munro becomes the first writer to have penned for both the classic and revived Doctor Who series. Perhaps unsurprisingly, then, there’s something of a more deliberate feel to this episode, focusing on world-building and its supporting cast while hinting at the mystery of the Doctor and relying on the companion to drive the narrative forward. While those latter two aspects can certainly be attributed to any number of modern episodes, few classic episodes indicated that seemingly-inevitable change in direction of the franchise as well as Munro’s original script, ‘Survival.’ Doctor Who has always been at its best when it juxtaposes the utterly bizarre with the commonplace, and perhaps no era of classic Doctor Who did this more successfully than the final two years of Sylvester McCoy’s run as more modern and recognizable settings took precedence. And although Scotland at the time of the Picts and Romans is hardly modern, it lends an incredibly distinctive atmosphere to the story that is further anchored by the juxtaposition of a dimensional gate within a cairn and the notion of crows speaking the name of a Pict warrior for all time…

The Wrath of the Iceni
Audio / January 13, 2017

Released March 2012 There are certain definitive instances in each Doctor’s timeline where he must confront the prospect of potentially altering the course of history for better or for worse. For Tom Baker’s Fourth Doctor, his most famously came in ‘Genesis of the Daleks’ when confronted with the opportunity of forever ridding the universe of the Dalek menace before it even had a chance to substantiate itself. ‘The Wrath of the Iceni’ provides another such moment for the Fourth Doctor as he and Leela travel to Britain at the time of Boudica’s rebellion during the Roman occupation, soon finding himself having to decide whether to save history or his companion. ‘The Wrath of the Iceni’ follows a fairly generic formula as Leela insists that the Doctor and she can help to make a meaningful difference as she comes to understand the state of affairs around her at this crucial period in Britain’s history. When the Doctor refuses to interfere on her behalf, the close relationship between the two is strained almost to the breaking point, the fact being that history must run its natural course. However, what makes another journey down this familiar path so particularly enjoyable here is that…