Starlight Robbery
Audio / November 16, 2016

Released August 2013 ‘Starlight Robbery’ continues the adventures of an older Seventh Doctor alongside Elizabeth Klein and Will Arrowsmith as they search for the key to an ominous alien technology, stumbling upon an intergalactic arms fair filled with incredibly dangerous individuals and run by the Urodelian criminal Garundel last seen in ‘Black and White.’ With Stuart Milligan’s Garunel taking centre stage, it follows that the story initially takes on a more humourous and light-hearted tone despite the setting threatening creatures surrounding him. The character seems to revel in his campiness, and the self-centeredness and self-confidence he resolutely displays is incredibly effective in making him a likably unlikable presence. This is all the more effective when the story takes a much darker turn leading into its final episode and, accordingly, into the final story of this trilogy, and Milligan is able to adjust his performance wonderfully. Although the Doctor is still at his manipulative best, unafraid to move his companions around to suit his needs even if that means putting them into extremely precarious situations, Klein still suffers from being written as a stereotypical companion rather than as the more nuanced and stringent character she has become over previous story arcs.…

Black and White
Audio / October 30, 2016

Released August 2012 Following the sensational ‘Protect and Survive,’ ‘Black and White’ continues this latest Seventh Doctor trilogy with a tale that finally offers answers to questions that have been building since Hex’s first appearance. Fitting in Doctor Who’s take on the Beowulf legend as well as the monstrous Garundel ravishes the kingdom of Hrothgar, ‘Black and White’ comes precariously close on multiple instances of collapsing under its own weight and ambition but ultimately tells a very intriguing story that sets up the final story of this trilogy incredibly well. The answers are revealed at a fairly consistent pace, and the first episode is largely a standalone one that focuses on Sophie Aldred’s Ace, Philip Olivier’s Hex, Maggie O’Neill’s Lyssandra from ‘Project: Destiny,’ and Amy Pemberton’s Sally from ‘House of Blue Fire’ slowly figuring out what is going on around them. As it turns out, the TARDIS’s white façade over the past several stories is not just a meaningless colour change, and the Doctor has also been using a corresponding black TARDIS to help with recruitment of soldiers in his eternal battle against the Elder Gods. Hex and Sally create a very natural pairing, though their quick comfort with each…

Lurkers at Sunlight’s Edge
Audio / October 5, 2016

Released November 2010 The final installment of this Seventh Doctor is a bit of an odd one. Following the monumental and emotionally laden ‘Project: Destiny’ and ‘A Death in the Family,’ having the third and final story be a standalone adventure creates a rather disjointed experience when taken as a whole. Individually, however, writer Marty Ross channels the eminent works of HP Lovecraft as he explores the internal tragedies of the life of CP Doveday. Lovecraft, of course, flourished with suspense, relying on fragments of description to carry his various horrors and to terrify his audience. This approach was could have worked quite well in the audio medium as well, but while the tall and loud descriptions of the titular lurkers are fragmentary at best, the creatures themselves only serve to instill terror in the people directly in their presence as they trudge and roar. This is one case where further description could have helped immensely. Even as Doveday himself sometimes transfigures between alien and human forms, his yelling in the alien language adds little drama or tension. Giving Doveday’s Shuddersome Tales a foundation in reality is a clever concept that blurs the lines of fiction and nonfiction, but that…

The Reaping
Audio / May 26, 2016

Released September 2006 For Peri Brown, it’s been two years since she decided to join the Doctor on his travels throughout the universe. Upon discovering that her best friend’s father has been murdered, she insists that the Doctor take her back to Baltimore so that she can be part of the ensuing funeral and wake services. As Peri soon finds out, though, suddenly disappearing for four months in her family’s eyes has had devastating consequences; her stepfather has been accused of aiding in the kidnapping of Peri and has divorced her mother, someone who feels as though Peri’s reappearance is a ploy to become the centre of attention once more. The Doctor, deciding to sidestep the turbulent family emotions, instead embarks on a mission to solve the murder of Anthony Chambers, leading to a startling revelation as he discovers Cybermen who have been awaiting his arrival. As the Cybermen continue to fight for survival, ‘The Reaping’ does a good job in bringing out the requisite horror that the species demands and that Big Finish has proven so adept at writing. In fact, ‘The Reaping’ features a fairly solid plan from the Cybermen to gain supremacy, a much more logical scheme…

Day of the Moon
Episode / March 18, 2016

Aired 30 April 2011 ‘Day of the Moon’ serves as a fantastic conclusion to the events set up in ‘The Impossible Astronaut,’ maintaining the pace and thrills throughout. However- as is increasingly the case with Doctor Who– despite the utterly excellent series of events that filled the running time, it’s the ending that will garner the most attention and discussion. The young girl undergoing an apparent regeneration opens up a whole new series of questions not only regarding who she will become but for the entire programme in general since no Time Lords should remain. There are some clear hints that Amy is the girl’s mother, even though Amy seems to think she is not pregnant and the Doctor’s scans prove inconclusive, but what exactly does that mean if true? As for the conclusion of the story proper, it likely comes as little surprise that the moon landing was used to swing events against the Silence, but the progression of events leading up to this all make perfect sense and the overall execution of the recording within the moon landing video is absolutely a memorable victory considering how great the threat is that the Silence pose. The jump ahead three…

The Impossible Astronaut
Episode / March 18, 2016

Aired 23 April 2011 Doctor Who wastes no time in setting major events in motion in ‘The Impossible Astronaut.’ Despite weeks of teases that one of the main characters was going to die in the season opener, it’s unlikely that the Doctor himself made it to the top of many prediction lists. And while there will undoubtedly be some clever plot devices and actions that allow these events to change in the 200 years before they occur in the Doctor’s personal timeline, it’s still a shocking sequence to be hold especially since, as it stands, the speed with which he dies does not allow for regeneration. ‘The Impossible Astronaut’ is an ambitious episode with ambitious scope, filmed on location in the US and offering sense of worldwide peril rather than a more isolated threat as usual. While there are many threads already being weaved into events, it’s the Silence mentioned so frequently in the previous run of episodes that offers the most satisfying connection. Finally the Silence is revealed, a visually sinister race that has the unnerving ability to be completely forgotten when not being looked at directly. The scenes featuring this new race, even as they stand in the…