Lords of the Red Planet
Audio / August 9, 2017

Released November 2013 The final Second Doctor instalment of The Lost Stories range again comes from the mind of Brian Hayles, returning to his most enduring creations and offering an origin story of sorts for the Ice Warriors. Landing on Mars in a time that should be before the Ice Warriors roamed its surface, the Doctor, Jamie, and Zoe soon discover a plan beneath the surface that will result in the creation of a terrifying army composed of a very familiar foe. As the true lords of Mars emerge and the secret within the Gandoran mines is revealed, both the bonds of friendship and of loyalty to command will be tested. ‘Lords of the Red Planet’ was originally intended for season six following the previous season’s successful introduction of the foes in ‘The Ice Warriors,’ but it was ultimately bypassed in favour of ‘The Seeds of Death.’ Within that context, it’s quite interesting that a genesis story was already a consideration for the Ice Warriors, especially since even the mighty Daleks had not received one at that point. Of course, with the implication that the beings created here are possibly not the true first Ice Warriors, what is instead presented…

The Queen of Time
Audio / August 6, 2017

Released October 2013 Brian Hayles is best remembered as the creator of the Ice Warriors who fleshed out the gallery of rogues the Second Doctor would confront on his journeys through time and space, but he also created the Celestial Toymaker as the end of the First Doctor era neared. With Big Finish opting to remain with aborted Hayles storylines for the second release in the fourth series of The Lost Stories as it returns to the Second Doctor era, a sequel of sorts to ‘The Celestial Toymaker’ is offered up in ‘The Queen of Time.’ As the Doctor, Jamie, and Zoe confront the godlike Hecuba in her realm of clocks and traps, they soon find that their own time is running out. ‘The Queen of Time’ is quite unique in both its concept and execution, and it fits perfectly alongside the likes of ‘The Mind Robber’ by imbuing a sense of experimentalism to a time period more often than not filled with base under siege tales. This particular TARDIS trio is always brimming with enthusiasm and a sense of playfulness no matter the danger that befalls its members, and having them fall victim to the unpredictable sister of the…

The Rosemariners
Audio / August 2, 2017

Released September 2012 The third series of The Lost Stories comes to a close with ‘The Rosemariners,’ a revisitation of season six and the Second Doctor era that has the distinction of being adapted for audio by original scribe Donald Tosh. When the Doctor, Jamie, and Zoe find themselves aboard Earth Station 454 during its closure that is being supervised by the Rosemariners of Rosa Damascena, they soon discover a terrifying plot in a world in which nobody is quite what they seem. Continuing the Big Finish early era trend of meshing voice acting with linking narration, ‘The Rosemariners’ strikes a perfect balance and flows easily from beginning to end. With David Warner as well-meaning xeno-botanist Professor Arnold Biggs and Clive Wood as megalomaniacal Commander Rugosa joining Frazer Hines and Wendy Padbury, there is far less repetition in voices than can sometimes be the case in these types of serials, lending a great degree of immersion as the subterfuge aboard the station becomes known. As always, the overall narrative’s success rests squarely upon the shoulders of the original cast members, and both Hines and Padbury do wonderful work with their multiple roles, Hines again excelling with his masterful realization of…

The Two Doctors
Episode / April 12, 2017

Aired 16 February – 2 March 1985 ‘The Two Doctors’ has a mixed reputation and is unabashedly a far departure from the somewhat lighter and more celebratory nature of the previous multi-Doctor tales ‘The Three Doctors’ and ‘The Five Doctors.’ Indeed, writer Robert Holmes’s trademark cynicism fits in perfectly with the more sinister trajectory Doctor Who began taking under producer John Nathan-Turner, though he also manages to impart a more likable edge to the gruff Sixth Doctor as the character’s insults are tempered by a genuine sense of wit and intelligence, firmly establishing him as the genuine Doctor by the end of events while paired with his second incarnation. Anyone with knowledge of the Second Doctor would be forgiven for thinking that ‘The Two Doctors’ would emphasize the character’s more comedic and impish nature that has only become more fondly remembered in the years since his regeneration. And although Patrick Troughton does prove adept at stealing the scene whenever he can instill a bit of comedy into proceedings, the serial as a whole is incredibly dark. Unfortunately, while the Sixth Doctor is purposefully a bit rough around the edges, even if the more violent means by which the writers chose…

The Five Doctors
Episode / March 24, 2017

Aired 23 November 1983 ‘The Five Doctors’ represents the culmination of twenty years of Doctor Who, a feature-length special that does its best to bring the five distinct eras of the franchise together with a cavalcade of guest appearances by friends and foes alike. From the outset, it’s clear that writer Terrance Dicks is not striving to offer a meaningful story that explores the depth of the Doctor as a character or that fundamentally changes the core nature of Doctor Who, but ‘The Five Doctors’ is an unequivocal success when taken simply as a nostalgic celebration that focuses more on spectacle than on story. It’s interesting to note just how much attention is drawn to the questions regarding continuity that allow this adventure to take place, especially as continuity seemed to be pervading the programme more and more at the time. Part of this, naturally, is down to Tom Baker choosing not to reprise his role for the special after so recently departing. While the inclusion of scenes from the unfinished ‘Shada’ do at least allow a cameo of sorts for both Baker and Lalla Ward, it means that some of the resulting pairings of Doctors and companions are a…

Last of the Cybermen
Audio / December 30, 2016

Released May 2015 Ten years after the assault on Telos that effectively ended the Great Cyber War, the Doctor, Jamie, and Zoe set out to explore the meaning of a giant Cyber-head at the galaxy’s furthest reaches. As his companions try to discover if the universe has really seen the end of the Cybermen, though, so, too, do they try to discover just who the man in the multicoloured coat claiming to be the Doctor truly is and how he has come to be there in their own Doctor’s place. Although the reason for later Doctors suddenly appearing in their earlier incarnations’ timelines is still not addressed, Colin Baker’s Sixth Doctor is the perfect counterpoint to Patrick Troughton’s Second, especially as the Sixth’s characterization here is an amalgamation of the earlier televised Sixth incarnation along with the more mellowed and compassionate audio version. Subtlety is out the window here, and Colin Baker is clearly relishing the opportunity to add a slightly more antagonistic and gruff edge to his character while still staying true to the years of characterization at Big Finish. However, it’s the companions that keep this tale firmly rooted in the Second Doctor’s era, and both Frazer Hines…

The Three Doctors
Episode / November 8, 2016

Aired 30 December 1972 – 20 January 1973 The first serial of Doctor Who’s tenth series does something the franchise has never attempted before, namely bringing together all three televised versions of the titular Time Lord for one adventure. Also the story which sees the Third Doctor’s exile on Earth end, ‘The Three Doctors’ is an incredibly important part of Doctor Who mythology that both redefines the character of the Doctor and once more reinvigorates the sense of freedom for his travels and adventures that was so important in the first two Doctors’ eras. Strangely, or perhaps purposefully, ‘The Three Doctors’ does nothing to act like a tenth anniversary special. The serial still airs in four weekly installments and little pomp is given to the arrival of the First and Second Doctors, the story only momentarily pausing to explain their identities and reasons for their presence. Even if the story does somewhat feel like the anniversary elements were inserted into a more standard episode at a later time, there’s no denying the joy that arises from seeing both William Hartnell and Patrick Troughton reprise their roles. The entire concept of regeneration and what it actually means to the Doctor was…

The Space Pirates
Episode / October 22, 2016

Aired 8 March – 12 April 1969 With five of six episodes missing from the video archives, ‘The Space Pirates’ is the final incomplete serial in Doctor Who’s vast library. Unfortunately, the surviving episode doesn’t really capture the scope and breadth of this sprawling space opera, and the reputation of this penultimate Troughton episode suffers as a result, but the very human affairs in the vastness of space offer something unique for the era and unquestionably still hold merit even if the end result is not classified as a classic. The strongest aspect of ‘The Space Pirates’ is undoubtedly Robert Holmes’s characterization, building upon a trend started with the main villain his previous script ‘The Krotons.’ Jay Mack plays the dubiously over-the-top commander of the International Space Corps to great effect even if the performance is sometimes a bit too much as the character ignores obvious clues and distances himself from his crew. Gordon Gostelow’s Milo Clancey proves to be the perfect contrast to General Hermack, standing up to and humiliating him at every opportunity. His mustachioed cowboy appearance again may be too egregious for some, but it is keeping in line with the slightly grandiloquent tone of the serial.…

The Seeds of Death
Episode / October 21, 2016

Aired 25 January – 1 March 1969 Following a run of relatively varied story types, Doctor Who returns to its trusted base under siege formula with ‘The Seeds of Death,’ once more showcasing the Ice Warrior race that had made such an impact just as the titular foe a year earlier. Although the story plays it relatively safe in regards to overall plot despite some rather forward-thinking and chilling segments, ‘The Seeds of Death’ certainly offers plenty of spectacle and ends up being another fine example of the Troughton era. Wisely, ‘The Seeds of Death’ uses a moonbase as the setting, tapping into the space race that consumed the public consciousness as the Apollo 11 moon landing neared. It seems superfluous to the story that such a significant portion of the beginning is dedicated to the Doctor, Jamie, and Zoe experiencing the entire rocket sequence from takeoff to landing since the T-Mat transmat device is fixed before they even arrive on the moon, but this again shows just how exciting the overall prospect of rocket travel was at the time. Intriguingly and in a moment of prescience, the transmat technology has dulled humanity’s sense of exploration and ambition since instantaneous…

The Krotons
Episode / October 19, 2016

Aired 28 December 1968 – 18 January 1969 ‘The Krotons’ is another serial that Doctor Who fans do not hold in incredibly high regard, but for a long time it was the only complete Patrick Troughton episode remaining in the video archives. ‘The Krotons’ has a rather long history to it, the concept originating as a play entitled The Trap and initially being rejected as a Doctor Who serial during William Hartnell’s time when anticipation for the Mechanoids’ success during ‘The Chase’ was at its highest. Yet as Frazer Hines decided to renew his contract for one more year to leave alongside Patrick Troughton, other scripts were running into issues, and Robert Holmes became an increasingly important figure for Doctor Who as ‘The Krotons’ was pushed forward in the production order. Even if the story does ultimately give off the impression of being a rather low-budget runaround and not necessarily indicative of the true essence of the Troughton era, but that is an inherently invigorating prospect as the Doctor and his companions arrive in a world already overtaken and get to be reactive as figures of change rather than proactive as figures of protection and stability. In that respect, the…